Monthly Archives: February 2019

Merewether is top of class

Stars: Elly Diamandis- Nikoletatos, Jazmyn Wood, Lizzy Mee. Front row, Libby Ellis, Owen Small, Rachel Vakil and Priya Vakil. Picture: Simone De PeakMEREWETHER High can lay claim tosome of the region’s brightest stars in this year’s Higher School Certificate, after 15 studentsachievedmarks that landed them in the state’s top 20 for at least onesubject.
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Principal Christine Rippon said it was the first time in recent memory thenumber of students on theTop Achievers list –for those whoreceivea ranked place in a subject as well as a mark over 90 –hadbroken through to double digits.

“The results keep getting better and better each year,” Ms Rippon said.

“We want to support our kids to get the best they can, because they have dreams and things they want to achieve.”

A day after Owen Small was named first in Geography, his resultspropelled him into second place in German Continuers and 17thin Legal Studies. He received a mark of 97 for all three.

“It was a pretty big surprise but I am very happy,” Owen said. “I never could have imagined or thought first in Geography was possible, but I’m pretty proud of my efforts.”

Lizzy Mee was fifth in Chemistry and eighth in Geography, while Libby Ellis was third in Hospitality and seventh in Food Technology.

Rizina Yadav –who is overseas attending an interview with the University of Oxford and been offered a $50,000 scholarship to the University of Sydney – was ninth in Society and Culture and 16thin Legal Studies.

Owen and Lizzy’s results follow their receipt of the state’s equal fourth and seventh highest markin Biology, which they completedas an accelerated course last year.

Lizzy has since been offered Australian National University’s prestigious Tuckwell Scholarship.

Owen, 18, said his performance in German Continuers was the most personally rewarding.

“It’s the subject I’m most passionate about and I’m pleased with how I improved over the years.”

Owen balanced study with his part time job, exercise and volunteering at Cooks Hill Surf Life Saving Club, but said he still put in “a big effort” to achieving his high results, including about three hours study each afternoon and devoting one day of each weekend to schoolwork.

“I didn’t always have good time management but towards the end of the year it improved –it’s a good skill to come out of the HSC with.

“I did not really want to finish the yearand think ‘I wish I had done a little more work’. It was not the most fun year but it was a good experience to knuckle down and work hard for something.”

Owen is hoping to take a gap year in 2018 and travel, including to Germany. He is interested in a biology or science based degree.

Merewether’s Rachel Vakil said she was “overjoyed” to receive fourth place in Food Technology, alongside classmates Lauren Moore who was second, Caitlin Field who was sixth and Libby Ellis who was seventh.

“I’m so proud our girls made it up there, we had such an amazing class,worked together and couldn’t have done it without our teacher Vicky McCudden who supported us through everything.”

Rachel’s twin sister Priya was 10thin Ancient History. “We would study together and keep pushing each other to do our best,” she said. “It was good competition but also a support system to help each other out.”

Libby Ellis said her results wereanother step towards her dream of opening a cafe. She has received six offers from American colleges to play soccer and study business next year.

St Francis Xavier’s College at Hamilton had the Hunter’s next highest number on the Top Achievers list.

Lachlan Tolomeo was fourth in the state in MathematicsGeneral 2, while Thomas Howlettwas fifth in Industrial Technology with a mark of 98.

Thomas, 18, said he had never heard of the subject until he enrolled at the school in year 11. “I was pretty surprised and did not think I could do something like this. But I put my mind to it and here I am.”

Scone Grammar’s Shannon Nichols was fifth in English Extension 1 and sixth in Community and Family Studies.

Hunter excels in HSC 2017.Lambton High and Newcastle Grammar named among All Rounders.Hunter students top state in subjects.Merewether sets ATAR record.

Historic home moving on

Historic home moving on NEW CHAPTER: Developer Melissa Calder-Mason with Bruce Gow. Picture: Marina Neil
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WELL-KNOWN: The home at 81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in 1887. Picture: Marina Neil

TREE CHANGE: The residence will be relocated to Lovedale to make way for a new development. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Developer Melissa Calder-Mason with Bruce Gow, whose great-grandfather built the home at 81 Patrick Street, Merewether. Picture: Marina Neil

FOURTH GENERATION: Peter Gow grew up in the house at 81 Patrick Street, Merewether that was was built by his great-grandfather in the late 1880s. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

IMMACULATE: The gardens at 81 Patrick Street are well-known to Merewether residents. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

A copy of an original image of the house in the early 1900s.

The home at 81 Patrick Street through the years.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether houses the oldest registered flushing toilet in Newcastle.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether houses the oldest registered flushing toilet in Newcastle.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether houses the oldest registered flushing toilet in Newcastle.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether was built in the late 1880s.

81 Patrick Street, Merewether houses Newcastle’s oldest toilet.

TweetFacebookNewcastle Heraldwhen McGrath Estate Agents listed to home for sale in August.

“I think the gardenis it’s most iconic, remembered feature, and how mum’s been out there forever.”

Historic Merewether home listed for first sale

MsCalder-Mason hopes to relocate as much of the gardens as possible to Lovedale and also plans to move the city’s oldest registered toilet which is housed at 81 Patrick Street.

It was the third ever toilet plumbed and installed in Newcastle and in its formativeyears strangers would reportedlyturn up on Sunday afternoonsto view it in action.

Grill’d boss wants to resolve Hoges dispute over a burger – ‘but no knives’

Paul Hogan is to be given an AACTA award for lifetime achievement.6th December 2016.Photo: Steven Siewert
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The owner of burger chain Grill’d is bemused by the fact that entertainment legend Paul Hogan is suing him for using a version of the classic line, “That’s not a knife, THAT’s a knife”.

Simon Crowe says he wants to sit down and “resolve the matter man to man – but no knives”.

Mr Crowe said he was surprised to discover the Crocodile Dundee star was suing Grill’d for using a version of the iconic line attributed to Hogan’s character Mick Dundee on its cutlery sleeves.

“I’m surprised and touched, a little sheepish that this is something that has actually registered in the public domain,” Mr Crowe said.

“He’s an institution of the country and who knows where this goes but I certainly hope there’s no bad blood between us.

“If I could have my way, I’d suggest that he come to one of our local restaurants and we sit down over a burger to actually resolve the matter.”

Court documents filed by Sydney firm Robinson Legal on behalf of Mr Hogan claim Grill’d has breached copyright and made “false and misleading” representations implying sponsorship or approval by Mr Hogan or his production company Rimfire Films.

Hogan, who co-wrote the 1986 comedy, is seeking an injunction to stop the burger restaurants using the quote plus damages and costs.

The actor’s lawyer Andrew Robinson said the phrase was only associated with Hogan and the film.

“What could your purpose possibly be unless you were trying to convince your customers you had some association with Paul Hogan or Mick Dundee?”

“It’s an incredibly famous line and everyone associates it with Paul Hogan and these guys are trying to get commercial benefit from being associated with Hogan and we believe the law will stop them.”

“We asked them to stop using the line and they’ve refused so I assume they’re going to defend and argue that we’re wrong.”

“They didn’t ask for our consent.”

Mr Crowe believes the line from the 30-year-old movie is now so famous that it’s become part of the language.

“We’ve never claimed that [Hogan] has endorsed this but we certainly believe the term is now part of the Australian vernacular,” he said.

“I’m not sure from a legal perspective where he stands but from a public perception perspective I hope he’s not going to own or try to own the term ‘G’day mate’ or even ‘Where the bloody hell are you?'”

“These things enter the public domain and they’re part of the Australian vernacular. I don’t know why he’s doing it.”

Hogan, who lives in California, is currently in Australia to promote his new film That’s Not My Dog!

This is not the first time the 78-year-old star has taken legal action over references to his career-defining moment.

In 1986 he successfully sued Grosby Shoes over an ad parodying the film.

He won another court battle in 1988 when he sued a Surfers Paradise shop for calling itself Koala Dundee.

Mr Hogan has also had a long-running dispute with the Australian Taxation Office.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Land tax to surge by an extra $870m as values continue to rise

Land tax receipts from owners of investment properties and holiday homes in NSW are forecast to be $870 million higher than expected over the next three years due to a spike in values.
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The windfall figure is contained in the half-yearly budget review released by NSW Treasurer Dominic Perrottet on Thursday, which also reveals the initial anticipated cost of the government’s announcement that motorists who pay more than $1300 in motorway tolls a year will receive free registration.

While Premier Gladys Berejiklian initially estimated the cost at up to $100 million, the half-yearly update says it is forecast to cost $162 million over the four years from 2018-19 and 2021-22.

The review says that following a determination by the NSW Valuer-General in July, land tax revenue is expected to be $105.9 million higher than the forecast in the June budget for 2017-18.

Over the three years to 2020-21 it says land tax revenue is expected to be $867.2 million higher than forecast in June “due to higher than expected land values and their ongoing effect through three year averaging”.

As foreshadowed by Fairfax Media on Thursday, Mr Perrottet announced the forecast surplus for 2017-18 has increased from $2.7 billion estimated in June to $3.3 billion.

This is due to a shift in the timing of agency expenditure, leading to a reduction in expenses this financial year.

Average surpluses of $2.1 billion a year are forecast across the forward estimates to 2020-21.

The review also shows NSW’s infrastructure spending will increase from $72 billion to $80.1 billion over four years.

Net debt sits at negative $9.3 billion, but the review shows it is expected to climb to $23.7 billion by 2020-21 as surpluses and the proceeds of transactions like asset privatisations are ploughed into infrastructure projects.

As also foreshadowed, stamp duty revenue in the three years to 2020-21 being revised down by $657 million.

This was largely due to the take up of stamp duty concessions for first home buyers in a housing affordability package announced in the June budget.

Between June and November, 13,672 people have received stamp duty concessions, compared with 3970 people in the same five month period last year.

The review reveals that payroll tax revenue has also been revised upwards by $189.5 million since June due to strong employment growth. In the three years to 2020-21, payroll tax revenue is expected to be $991.2 million higher than forecast in June.

However, expenses are forecast to grow by an extra $2.4 billion to 2020-21 due to new policies including $2 billion in reservations for projects from the government’s Restart NSW infrastructure fund as well as energy rebates and regional council roads grants.

Announcing the results, Mr Perrottet said despite the surpluses “slowing revenue growth and emerging expense pressures will create challenges for the budget in the years ahead”.

“These challenges will require the government’s continued financial discipline and pursuit of reforms that contribute to economic growth and maintain a sustainable budget position,” he said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.