Monthly Archives: September 2018

Top three: Allhomes’ pick of open homes to see this weekend in Canberra

GRIFFITH
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4 Jansz Crescent(pictured)

$2.5 million +

5 bed 3 bath 2 car

EER: 4

Nestled within a canopy of oak trees and backing reserve parkland and ovals, a property of distinction offers generous and flexible living for families. A spacious entrance way sweeps down to the formal lounge and dining rooms – both with French doors opening onto private courtyards.

The large, north facing family room and meals area flows from the well-equipped kitchen and onto the paved entertaining area with a sensational indoor swimming pool.

The indoor swimming pool area features a spa, sauna and full bathroom. Cathedral ceilings frame a wall of glass looking out to the mature trees and landscaped garden.

Live a lifestyle of convenience, a very short walk from Canberra Grammar School, or wander as a family down to Manuka Village and Lake Burley Griffin.

Agents: Richard Luton & Sophie Luton, Luton Properties Manuka, 0418 697 844 & 0410 750 413

Auction: Saturday, February 24, 10am

CASEY

55 Dalkin Crescent

$650,000 +

3 bed 2 bath 3 car

EER: 7

55 Dalkin Crescent, Casey Photo: Luton Properties Canberra City

Built to the highest of specifications with energy efficient inclusions throughout, this unique 222-square-metre home sets a new benchmark in designer living. It combines a chic country industrial aesthetic with seamless indoor and outdoor flow, while the local community shops are a stroll away.

Agents: Jess Smith & Kris Hellier, McGrath Estate Agents Gungahlin, 0410 125 475 & 0413 799 700

Auction: Saturday, December 16, 3.45pm

TORRENS

3/9 Darke Street

$845,000 +

3 bed 2 bath 2 car

EER: 7

3/9 Darke Street, Torrens Photo: Luton Properties Canberra City

Positioned in the highly regarded suburb of Torrens, this architecturally designed residence has been meticulously considered to focus on liveability, flowing spaces and quality. The property also enjoys an abundance of natural light and more than 200 square metres of private courtyard space perfect for the summer months.

Agents: Slade Minson, Luton Properties Canberra City, 0435 659 746

Private sale

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

How do these three-year-old twin white lions beat the heat? With an icy-pole, of course!

How do these three-year-old twin white lions beat the heat? With an icy-pole, of course! STAYING COOL: White lions Nala and Kovu cool down in the spray of a hose at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers
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STAYING COOL: A squirrel monkey investigates a fruity iceblock at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

STAYING COOL: A squirrel monkey investigates a fruity iceblock from zookeeper Krissy Simmonds at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

STAYING COOL: A squirrel monkey investigates a fruity iceblock at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

STAYING COOL: A squirrel monkey at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

STAYING COOL: Squirrel monkeys investigates a fruity iceblock from zookeeper Krissy Simmonds at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Kovu the white lion cools down in the spray of a hose at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

White lions Nala and Kovu cool down in the spray of a hose at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

White lions Nala and Kovu cool down in the spray of a hose at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

White lions Nala and Kovu cool down in the spray of a hose at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Kovu the white lions cools down in the spray of a hose at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Kovu the white lion cools down in the spray of a hose from zoo owner Jason Pearson at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Hunter Valley Zoo owner Jason Pearson sprays the hose to cool down white lions Nala and Kovu on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

White lions Kovu and Nala cool down in the spray of a hose at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

White lions Nala and Kovu cool down in the spray of a hose at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Kovu the white lion cools down in the spray of a hose at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Kovu the white lion cools down in the spray of a hose at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Kovu and Nala the white lion cool down with some blood ice blocks at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Kovuthe white lion cools down with some blood ice blocks at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Black-and-white ruffed lemurs have their first try of a fruity iceblock from zookeeper Krissy Simmonds at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Black-and-white ruffed lemurs have their first try of a fruity iceblock from zookeeper Krissy Simmonds at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

A lemur investigates a fruity iceblock from zookeeper Krissy Simmonds at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Black-and-white ruffed lemurs have their first try of a fruity iceblock at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Black-and-white ruffed lemurs have their first try of a fruity iceblock at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Black-and-white ruffed lemurs have their first try of a fruity iceblock from zookeeper Krissy Simmonds at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Tamarind monkeys investigate a fruity iceblock from zookeeper Krissy Simmonds at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Black-and-white ruffed lemurs have their first try of a fruity iceblock from zookeeper Krissy Simmonds at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

A lemur investigates a fruity iceblock from zookeeper Krissy Simmonds at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

A pygmy marmoset investigates a fruity iceblock at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Tamarind monkeys investigate a fruity iceblock from zookeeper Krissy Simmonds at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

A lemur investigates a fruity iceblock from zookeeper Krissy Simmonds at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Kovu the white lion cools off at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Ernie the emu plays in a sprinkler at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Lemurs investigate a fruity iceblock at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Ernie the emu plays in a sprinkler at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Ernie the emu plays in a sprinkler at Hunter Valley Zoo on Thursday, when the temperature hit 40 degrees. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

TweetFacebookThe zoo’s new ring-tailed lemurs tried ice blocks for the first time on Thursday, while resident emu Ernie enjoyed a run through the sprinkler.

Mr Pearson said the animals will take it easy during the heat and find a spot in the shade.

“Animals are a lot smarter than human beings –they won’t force themselves to do anything,” he said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Myanmar arrests two Reuters journalists

Rani Begum 28 yrs old (left) and her daughter Sadiya Begum 10yrs old (right) at the entrance to a temporary shelter inside Camp 1 home to 71 Rohingya families that fled the violence in Myanmar in 2012. Rani??????s husband was killed by the Myanmar police and his body was found 3 days later in several pieces. Her daughter Sumiya was also wounded by a machete attack in Myanmar 5 years ago, she was 7 at the time. They fled Myanmar for Bangladesh then to India. Rani occasionally works as a domestic cleaner earning approx 1500 to 2000 rupee??????s a month. The Indian government is threatening to deport Rohingya refugee??????s. Balapur, Cyberabad, Hyderabad. 22nd September, 2017. Photo: Kate Geraghty Bangkok: Myanmar’s government has charged two Reuters journalists who had been leaked documents on brutal military-led attacks on Rohingya Muslims in the country’s Rakhine State.
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Reuters said it was “outraged” by the arrests of Wa Lone, 31 and Kyaw Soe Oo, 27, who have been held under the country’s draconian Official Secrets Act that carries penalties of up to 14 years jail.

“The two journalists obtained the documents by deception from the two policemen who came back from Rakhine state after serving security duties,” Myanmar police said in a statement.

The United States embassy in Myanmar said it was “deeply concerned” about the arrests and urged the government to allow access to the pair.

“For a democracy to succeed journalists must be allowed to do their jobs,” it said.

The European Union has also voiced its concern.

More than 625,000 Rohingya have fled Rakhine for Bangladesh since August after Myanmar’s military and vigilante Buddhists rampaged through villages, killing, raping and burning them in what the United Nations says amounts to “textbook ethnic cleansing” and “very likely” crimes against humanity.

A humanitarian emergency is unfolding in Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh.

Myanmar’s Information Ministry said in a statement the reporters “illegally acquired information with the intention to share it with the foreign media.”

The ministry’s Facebook page showed them in handcuffs standing behind a table with documents, mobile telephones and currency.

Irrawaddy online news said Wa Lone was found in the possession of a Myanmar Border Guard document that detailed security force numbers and the amount of ammunition they had used in the first wave of atrocities in late August, after Muslim insurgents had attacked 30 police posts.

Myanmar’s military has denied killing any innocent civilians.

Reuters said Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe, an ethnic Rakhine Buddhist from the state’s capital Sittwe, went missing after being invited to meet police officials over dinner in Yangon.

Two policemen have also been arrested.

Stephen Adler, editor-in-chief of Reuters, said “we are outraged by this blatant attack on press freedom”.

Myanmar journalists have faced increasing harassment this year under the government led by Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, who has been widely condemned for failing to defend 1.1 million Rohingya who were living in Rakhine.

Hatred of Muslims has swept the Buddhist-majority country under Suu Kyi’s leadership.

Several Myanmar reporters have been arrested in recent months.

Two reporters from Malaysia and Singapore and their driver were jailed for flying a drone over Myanmar’s parliament.

In one prominent case, Myanmar Now news editor Swe Win was charged with insulting a Buddhist monk who praised the killer of a Muslim government lawyer.

The trial is still ongoing.

Shawn Crispin, senior south-east Asia representative for the Committee to Project Journalists, said the arrests “come amid a widening crackdown which is having a grave impact on the ability of journalists to cover a story of vital global importance.”

The Turnbull government has resisted growing calls to end the Australian Defence Force’s training and support to Myanmar’s military in response to the atrocities.

Foreign Minister Julie Bishop has said Australia is “deeply concerned” by the violence but has avoided directly condemning either Suu Kyi’s government or the Myanmar military.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Jobs data ‘surprisingly’ strong in November

RESTAURANT 090103 AFR photo TAMARA VONINSKI **AFR FIRST USE** Otto Ristorante Italiano in Woolloomooloo. generic restaurant bar cafe coffee barista espresso fine dining upscale tourism service industry meal wine glasses dine table Sydney waiter waitress wait staff jobs work worker employment unemployment economy***FDCTRANSFER***Australia’s labour market is still the economy’s shining light, with employers maintaining the longest continuous hiring run in 23 years in November, keeping the jobless rate at a 4 1/2-year low.
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The figures support the Reserve Bank of Australia’s optimism that the economy is gathering pace, with the jobless rate plateauing at 5.4 per cent for the past three months, the lowest level since February 2013 and much stronger than expected. The last time the jobless rate was so low for so long was in the three months ended February 2013.

The economy created 61,614 new jobs last month, its biggest monthly gain since the addition of 74,474 positions in October 2015, the Australian Bureau of Statistics said. Over the past year, trend employment increased 3.1 per cent, which is above the average year-on-year growth over the past 20 years at 1.9 per cent.

The data shows a positive split between full-time and part-time work, with the former growing by 41,900 persons in November and the latter growing by 19,700. The participation rate jumped to 65.5 per cent, above economists’ expectations of 65.1 per cent.

Financial markets reacted positively to the release with the Aussie dollar jumping to US76.64?? from US76.30??, showing ongoing steady improvement has lifted spirits the tightening labour market will eventually boost the wages growth the Reserve Bank and the government are hoping for.

The optimism comes amid widespread consternation at the disappointing quarter of weak wages growth.

Unemployment remains not just below the Reserve Bank’s forecast for the next two years – which is 5.5 per cent over the next two years – but is just 0.4 percentage points above the 5 per cent level the bank signals as “full employment.”

Underemployment has fallen from a historical high of 8.7 per cent in February to 8.4 per cent in November.

New South Wales recorded a pickup of 28,000 new jobs, already at the levels where companies are forced to pay higher wages due to a dearth of skilled works.

Victoria added the most with 33,000.

In Queensland, where the state election has just wrapped up, the jobs data was positive for the re-elected Labor government, showing 7,000 new jobs were added in November.

Economists were largely positive on the news, but warned it will need to continue into 2018 before wages start to stir enough that the Reserve Bank will feel confident enough to begin hiking official interest rates.

“It was a surprisingly strong result which is really positive,” said Felicity Emmett, senior economist at ANZ. “But we will need to see unemployment fall a bit more for wage growth pressure.

“We expect next year to see a gradual pickup in wages. Firms are now reporting it’s harder to find workers in particular areas which is a good sign.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Light rail ‘as planned’ but no rent relief for business

Light rail ‘as planned’ but no rent relief for business BIG BUILD: Scot MacDonald and transport officials inspect the Newcastle light rail project on Thursday. Pictures: Marina Neil
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BIG BUILD: Scot MacDonald and transport officials inspect the Newcastle light rail project on Thursday. Pictures: Marina Neil

BIG BUILD: Scot MacDonald and transport officials inspect the Newcastle light rail project on Thursday. Pictures: Marina Neil

BIG BUILD: Scot MacDonald and transport officials inspect the Newcastle light rail project on Thursday. Pictures: Marina Neil

BIG BUILD: Scot MacDonald and transport officials inspect the Newcastle light rail project on Thursday. Pictures: Marina Neil

BIG BUILD: Scot MacDonald and transport officials inspect the Newcastle light rail project on Thursday. Pictures: Marina Neil

BIG BUILD: Scot MacDonald and transport officials inspect the Newcastle light rail project on Thursday. Pictures: Marina Neil

BIG BUILD: Scot MacDonald and transport officials inspect the Newcastle light rail project on Thursday. Pictures: Marina Neil

TweetFacebookHe said fuelling the downturn was a perception in the community Hunter Street was a “no-go zone”.

“It would help us a lot if people realised that you can still come and shop on Hunter Street,” Mr Scott said.

“On any given day you can pull up out the front and find a park … people think the whole street is inaccessible and that’s partly to do with the signage, which I think is diverting people away.

“The city is not closed.”

Mr MacDonald pushed the case for seeing the government’s revitalisation program to the end. He said“all the signs are there” the CBD would be heavily populated at the end of the project.